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RWI BERLIN
NETWORK SEMINAR

The RWI Office Berlin organizes the "RWI Berlin Network Seminar" since 2023, inviting researchers based in Berlin to the RWI Berlin Office for research talks. The seminar is open to RWI-externals with prior registration (please email Claudia.Schmiedchen@rwi-essen.de).

Events 2024

Speaker: Macartan Humphreys (WZB Berlin, Humboldt University)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: Effects of economic and social incentives on bureaucratic quality - Experimental Evidence from Sierra Leone

Speaker: Martina Uccioli (IZA, University of Nottingham)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: tba

 

Speaker: Jason Sockin (Cornell University, IZA)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: tba

 

Speaker: Britta Gehrke (FU Berlin)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: tba

 

Speaker: Jan Nimczik (ESMT Berlin)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: The long-run Effects of Immigration: Evidence Across a Barrier to Refugee Settlement

Abstract: We identify the causal effect of immigration on productivity, wages, incomes, and rents in the long run using a spatial regression discontinuity design (RDD). Our spatial RDD builds on a short-lived barrier to refugee settlement within West Germany after WWII. Comparing municipalities in a narrow band around this barrier, we find no socio-economic differences before WWII. In particular, population density had always been identical. But when the barrier to refugee settlement was removed, population density was about 20 percentage points higher where refugees had been allowed to settle. In 2020, 70 years later, the higher population density still persists. Today’s higher density coincides with higher productivity, wages, and rents. We argue that these economic differences are the result of agglomeration economies driven by the higher population density where refugees had been allowed settle. We present three findings on the nature of these agglomeration economies.

Speaker: Christian Meyer (University of Oxford)

Location: Hybrid – Berliner Büro und Teams-Veranstaltung

Time: 12:00 - 13:00 pm

Title: Learning to see the world’s opportunities: memory, mental experiencing and the economic lives of the vulnerable

Abstract: Work in neuroscience and psychology has underscored the role of mental experiencing for decision making. Using the same senses that we use to perceive the world, mental experiencing enables us to compare the consequences of our actions across different decisions. Trauma affects our memory and thus may impede our ability to use mental experiencing effectively. We measure the quality of mental experiencing and evaluate how it impacts economic outcomes through two randomized controlled trials with vulnerable populations that have suffered trauma and violence. In a sample of refugees in Ethiopia, learning to generate "positive" mental experiences related to the host economy leads to increased intentions to stay, more economic activity, and improved wellbeing. In Colombia, we embed controlled mental experiencing within an entrepreneurship program to explore whether it may enhance its effectiveness. We compare outcomes of standard business training, business training with mental experiencing, and no training. Participants in the standard business training see declines in both mental experiencing and earnings. These negative effects disappear in the mental experiencing arm. The highest gains from improved mental experiencing accrue to the most vulnerable and traumatized participants inthe sample, highlighting the need for trauma-informed programs.

Speaker: Macartan Humphreys (WZB Berlin, Humboldt University)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: Effects of economic and social incentives on bureaucratic quality - Experimental Evidence from Sierra Leone

Events 2023

Speaker: Peter Haan (DIW Berlin & Freie Universität Berlin)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:00 - 11:00 am

Title: "Is Migration Reducing Labor Scarcity? Evidence From Long-Term Care"

Speaker: Jan Marcus (FU Berlin)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:00 - 11:00 am

Title: "What a difference a day makes: Mortality effects of the school starting age"

Speaker: Alexandra Spitz-Oener (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin und ROOKWOOL Foundation Berlin)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: Workplace Connections and Migration: Evidence from German Reunification

Speaker: Rajshri Jayaraman (ESTM)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: Does Co-Residence with Parents-in-law Reduce Women’s Employment in India?

Abstract: We examine the effect of co-residence with fathers- and mothers-in-law on married women’s employment in India. Instrumental variable fixed effects estimates using two different household panel datasets indicate that co-residence with a father-in-law reduces married women’s employment by 11-13%, while co-residence with a mother-in-law has no effect. Difference-in-difference estimates show that married women’s employment increases following the death of a co-residing father-in-law, but not mother-in-law. We investigate three classes of explanations for this: income effects, increased domestic responsibilities, and social norms. Our evidence is consistent with gender- and generational norms intersecting to constrain married women’s employment when parents-in-law co-reside.

Speaker: Giovanni Mastrobuoni (University of Turin, ESOMAS)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: Strategic Bureaucratic Opacity: Evidence from Death Investigation Laws and Police Killings

Abstract: Police accountability is essential in upholding the social contract. Monitoring the monitors is, however, not without difficulty. This paper reveals how police departments exploit specific laws surrounding death investigations to facilitate the under-reporting of police killings. Our results show that US counties in which law enforcement can certify the cause of death, including counties which appoint the sheriff as the lead death investigator, display $46 percent more under-reported police killings than their comparable adjacent counties. Drawing on a novel adapted-LATE potential outcomes' framework, we demonstrate that under-reported police killings are most often reclassified as `circumstances undetermined' homicides. We also show that counties with permissive death certification laws withhold more homicide reports from the public. The main under-reporting results are primarily driven by under-reporting of White and Hispanic deaths in our analysis sample, with the effect on Hispanic people particularly pronounced along the US-Mexico border region. We do not find evidence of moderating effects due to body-worn cameras, nor that excess under-reported killings are associated with more violence directed towards police. We do, however, note a nationwide positive correlation between the permissiveness of gun-laws and under-reported police killings. Our results do not indicate that other differences in death investigation systems – coroner vs. medical examiner, appointed vs. elected, or physician vs. non-physician – affect the under-reporting of police killings.

Speaker: Charlotte Bartels (DIW Berlin)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: Long-term effects of equal sharing: Evidence from inheritance rules for land

Speaker: Felix Kersting (Humboldt University of Berlin)

Location: Hybrid – Berlin Office and Teams Link

Time: 10:30 - 11:30 am

Title: Industrialization, returns, inequality (co-authored with Thilo Albers and Timo Stieglitz)

Abstract: How do technological revolutions impact wealth inequality? To answer this question, we turn to the industrial revolution and analyze its role for wealth concentration both empirically and theoretically. Based on a novel dataset on regional top wealth shares and industrialization in Prussia, we provide causal evidence that industrialization can explain the shift in the top 1 share observed over the 19th century and also led to a fattening of the wealth distribution's tail. We rationalize these effects by introducing a dynamic 2-sector structure featuring scale and dynastic type dependence into an overlapping generations model with heterogeneous returns to capital. The simulations suggest that the combination of these two features explains about half of the total increase of the top 1 share, while the other half resulted from the general increase in capital returns.